Author: Eddy, N.
Paper Title Page
MOBO02 Beam Instrumentation at the Fermilab IOTA Ring 21
 
  • N. Eddy, D.R. Broemmelsiek, K. Carlson, D.J. Crawford, J.S. Diamond, D.R. Edstrom, B.J. Fellenz, M.A. Ibrahim, J.D. Jarvis, V.A. Lebedev, S. Nagaitsev, J. Ruan, J.K. Santucci, A. Semenov, V.D. Shiltsev, G. Stancari, A. Valishev, D.C. Voy, A. Warner
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • N. Kuklev, I. Lobach
    University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  • S. Szustkowski
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: This manuscript has been authored by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics.
The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is a storage ring at the end of the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. The complex is intended to support accelerator R&D for the next generation of particle accelerators. The IOTA ring is currently operating with 150 MeV electrons injected from the FAST Linac and will also receive 2.5 MeV protons from the IOTA Proon Injector currently be installed. The current instrumentation and results along from the first electron commissioning run will be presented along with future plans.
 
slides icon Slides MOBO02 [47.588 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2019-MOBO02  
About • paper received ※ 09 September 2019       paper accepted ※ 10 September 2019       issue date ※ 10 November 2019  
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MOPP034 Beam Instrumentation Challenges for the Fermilab PIP-II Accelerator 180
 
  • V.E. Scarpine, N. Eddy, D. Frolov, M.A. Ibrahim, L.R. Prost, R.M. Thurman-Keup
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359.
Fermilab is undertaking the development of a new 800 MeV superconducting RF linac to replace it’s present normal conducting 400 MeV linac. The PIP-II linac warm front-end consists of an ion source, LEBT, RFQ and MEBT which includes an arbitrary pattern bunch chopper, to generate a 2.1 MeV, 2mA H beam. This is followed immediately by a series of superconducting RF cryomodules to produce a 800 MeV beam. Commissioning, operate and safety present challenges to the beam instrumentation. This paper describes these beam instrumentation challenges and the choices made for PIP-II.
 
poster icon Poster MOPP034 [0.999 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2019-MOPP034  
About • paper received ※ 10 September 2019       paper accepted ※ 11 September 2019       issue date ※ 10 November 2019  
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TUPP041 Observations of Long-Range and Short-Range Wakefield Effects on Electron-Beam Dynamics in TESLA-type Superconducting RF Cavities 423
 
  • A.H. Lumpkin, N. Eddy, D.R. Edstrom, J. Ruan, R.M. Thurman-Keup
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: This manuscript has been authored by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics.
The Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility has a unique configuration of a photocathode rf gun beam injecting two TESLA-type single cavities (CC1 and CC2) in series prior to the cryomodule. Beam propagation off axis in these cavities can result in both long-range and short-range transverse wakefields which can lead to emittance dilution within the macropulses and micropulses, respectively. Two configurations of a Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera viewing a downstream OTR screen were utilized to track centroid shifts during the macropulse (framing mode) for the long-range case and during the micropulse for the short-range case (~10-micron spatial resolution and 2-ps temporal resolution). Steering off axis before CC1, resulted in a 100-kHz bunch centroid oscillation within the macropulse that was detected by the downstream rf BPMs and the streak camera*. At 500 pC/b, 50b, and 4-mrad off-axis vertical steering into CC2, we observed an ~ 100-micron head-tail centroid shift in the streak camera image y(t) profiles which we attributed to a short-range wakefield effect. Additional results for kick-angle compensations and model results will be presented.
*A.H. Lumpkin et al., Phys. Rev. Accel. and Beams 21,064401 (2018).
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2019-TUPP041  
About • paper received ※ 10 September 2019       paper accepted ※ 11 September 2019       issue date ※ 10 November 2019  
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WEPP044 Beam Position Monitoring System for Fermilab’s Muon Campus 644
 
  • N. Patel, J.S. Diamond, N. Eddy, C.R. McClure, P.S. Prieto, D.C. Voy
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  A Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system has been designed for Fermilab Muon Campus. The BPM system measures Turn-by-Turn orbits as well as Closed Orbits (average of multiple turns). While in the early commissioning phase of this program, preliminary measurements have been made using these BPMs. This paper discusses the design and implementation of these BPMs.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-IBIC2019-WEPP044  
About • paper received ※ 09 September 2019       paper accepted ※ 12 September 2019       issue date ※ 10 November 2019  
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